Tips On Teaching Craft Classes

Teaching crafting classes is also an opportunity to meet new people and share my knowledge and creativity.

Pansy Hair Comb copy

Sometimes a person needs more than a single source of income.  Finding a way to generate multiple sources of income is often worth the effort required.  I make one-of-a-kind clothing and accessories, so once I sell an item, I have to make something new.

By teaching crafting classes, I can generate income on a more continuous basis.  Teaching crafting classes is also an opportunity to meet new people and share my knowledge and creativity.  There are a many factors involved in deciding on the fee for a craft class.  Supplies are only a small part of the expense involved in preparing for a class.  A lot of advance preparation is required for a class to be successful.

10 Things to Do to Prepare for a Craft Class

  1. Locate classroom space
  2. Determine fee payable for classroom space
  3. Calculate cost of supplies provided to students
  4. Establish rate for your teaching services
  5. Research local and online supply sources
  6. Create materials to publicize class
  7. Promote class on social media (Facebook, Pinterest, etc.)
  8. Make samples of project
  9. Compose and print instructions for class handouts
  10. Organize supplies and create kits for students

The most difficult item to quantify is the time involved in learning a new technique.  This time and effort is valuable.  The next class on my schedule is Basic Victorian Ribbonwork.  I can make a folded ribbon rose in a few minutes, but that was not the case when I first tried it.  I bought numerous books, spent many hours practicing, and bought yards of ribbon.

I learned many of the techniques I teach from “The Artful Ribbon” by Candace Kling.

The Artful Ribbon
The Artful Ribbon

“The Secrets of Fashioning Ribbon Flowers” by Helen Gibb was also helpful.  Although I use the traditional methods I learned to fashion roses, lilies, tulips, and other flowers, I have developed my unique style.

In summary, teaching classes allows me to share something I love, while encouraging students to try traditional techniques that are new to them.

Fabric Painting Fun (and Cleanup)

Paintstik rubbing on silk fabrice
Paintstik rubbing on silk fabric

I started teaching some classes at Truckee Meadows Community College (TMCC) in September.  One of the best things about going to classes, as a teacher or a student, is meeting new people who share common interests.

My first class was on creating beautiful jewelry from fabric.  Although many types of fabric may be used, some of my favorites are silk and Ultrasuede®.  I like to paint the fabric before I incorporate it into a jewelry design.  One of the methods I use for silk is making rubbings using Shiva Artist’s Paintstiks®.  Commercial texture plates are fine, but I also like to find everyday items and use them to create unique patterns.  The above photo is a sample of a rubbing made from a silicon trivet that I found at a dollar store.

One of the students from my fabric jewelry class invited me to speak in front of her quilting group regarding embellishment techniques.  I demonstrated rubbings made from polymer clay, paper crafting, and UTEE texture plates, along with textures created by plastic sink liners, silicone trivets, and other items.

One of the drawbacks to using Paintstiks is that the paint can be difficult to remove from your hands.  One of the women in the quilting group had a wonderful solution.  She recommended using a mixture of dish soap and sugar to remove the paint.  Commercial cleaners are available, but how great it is to use materials you already have around the house!

I look forward to teaching my next class.  Who knows what I might learn?